Book review : The Tangled Web: A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications

This is a review of the The Tangled Web: A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications book.tangledwebbook

(My) Conclusion

This books makes a great job explaining how the “bricks” of the Internet (HTTP, HTML, WWW, Cookies, Script Languages) are working (or not) from the security point of view. Also a very systematic coverage of the browser (in)security is done even if some of the information it starts to be outdated. The book audience is for web developers that are interested in inner workings of the browsers in order to write more secure code.

Chapter 1 Security in the world of web applications

This goal of this chapter is to set the scene for the rest of book. The main ideas are around the fact that security is non-algorithmic problem and the best ways to tackle security problems are very empirical (learning from mistakes, develop tools to detect and correct problems, and plan to have everything compromised).

Another part of the chapter is dedicated to the history of the web because for the author is very important to understand the history behind the well known “bricks” of the Internet (HTTP, HTML, WWW) in order to understand why they are completely broken from the security point of view. For a long time the Internet standards evolutions were dominated by vendors or stakeholders who did not care much about the long-term prospects of technology; see the Wikipedia Browser Wars page for a few examples.

Part I Anatomy of the web (Chapters 2 to 8)

The first part of the book is about the buildings blocks of the web: the HTTP protocol, the HTML language, the CSS, the scripting languages (JavaScript, VBScript) and the external browser plug-ins (Flash, SilverLight). For each of these building blocks, the author presents how are implemented and how are working (or not) in different browsers, what are the standards that supposed to drive the development and how these standards are very often incomplete or oblivious of security requirements.

In this part of the book the author speaks only briefly about the security features, knowing that the second part if the book supposed to be focused on security.

Part II Browser security features (Chapter 9 to 15)

The first security feature presented is the SOP (Same Policy Origin), which is also the most important mechanism to protect against hostile applications. The SOP behaviour is presented for the DOM documents, for XMLHttpRequest, for WebStorage and how the security policies for cookies could also impact the SOP.

A less known topic that is treated is the SOP inheritance; how the SOP is applied to pseudo-urls like about:, javascript: and data:. The conclusion is that each browser are treating the SOP inheritance on different ways (which can be incompatible) and it is preferable to create new frames or windows by pointing them to a server-suplied blank page with a definite origin.

Another less known browser features (that can affect the security) are deeply explained; the way the browsers are recognizing the content of the response (a.k.a content sniffing), the navigation to sensitive URI schemes like “javascript:”, “vbscript:”, “file:”, “about:”, “res:” and the way the browsers are protecting itself against rogue scripts (in the case of the rogue scripts protection the author is pointing the inefficiently  of the protections).

The last part is about different mechanisms that browsers are using in order to give special privileges to some specific web sites; the explained mechanisms are the form-based password managers, the hard-coded domain names and the Internet Explorer Zone model.

Part III Glimpse of things to come (Chapter 16 to 17)

This part is about the developments done by the industry to enhance the security of the browsers,

For the author there are two ways that the browser security could evolve; extend the existing frameworks/s or try to restrict the existing framework/s by creating new boundaries on the top of existing browser security model.

For the first alternative, the following solutions are presented: the W3C Cross-Origin Resource Sharing specification , the Microsoft response to CORS called XDomainRequest  (which by the way was deprecated by Microsoft) and W3C Uniform Messaging Policy.

For the second alternative the following solutions are presented: W3C (former Mozilla) Content Security Policy , (WebKit) Sandboxed frames and Strict Transport Security.

The last part is about how the new planned APIs and features could have impact on the browser and applications security. Very briefly are explained the “Binary HTTP”, WebSocket (which was not yet a standard when the book was written), JavaScript offline applications, P2P networking.

Chapter 18 Common web vulnerabilities

The last chapter is a nomenclature of different known vulnerabilities grouped by the place where it can happen (server side, client side). For each item a brief definition is done and links are provided towards previous chapters where the item has been discussed.

A Java implementation of CSRF mitigation using “double submit cookie” pattern

Goal of this articlecsrf

The goal of this article is to present an implementation of the “double submit cookie” pattern used to mitigate the Cross Site Request Forgery (CSRF) attacks. The proposed implementation is a Java filter plus a few auxiliary classes and it is (obviously) suitable for projects using the Java language as back-end technology.

Definition of CSRF and possible mitigations

In the case of a CSRF attack, the browser is tricked into making unauthorized requests on the victim’s behalf, without the victim’s knowledge. The general attack scenario contains the following steps:

  1. the victim connects to the vulnerable web-site, so it have a real, authenticated session.
  2. the hacker force the victim (usually using a spam/fishing email) to navigate to another (evil) web-site containing the CSRF attack.
  3. when the victim browser execute the (evil) web-site page, the browser will execute a (fraudulent) request to the vulnerable web-site using the user authenticated session. The user is not aware at all of the fact that navigating on the (evil) web-site will trigger an action on the vulnerable web-site.

For deeper explanations I strongly recommend  to read chapter 5 of Iron-Clad Java: Building Secure Applications book and/or the OWASP Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) Prevention Cheat Sheet.

Definition of “double submit cookie” pattern

When a user authenticates to a site, the site should generate a (cryptographically strong) pseudo-random value and set it as a cookie on the user’s machine separate from the session id. The server does not have to save this value in any way, that’s why this patterns is sometimes also called Stateless CSRF Defense.

The site then requires that every transaction request include this random value as a hidden form value (or other request parameter). A cross origin attacker cannot read any data sent from the server or modify cookie values, per the same-origin policy.

In the case of this mitigation technique the job of the client is very simple; just retrieve the CSRF cookie from the response and add it into a special header to all the requests:

csrfclient

Client workflow

The job of the server is a little more complex; create the CSRF cookie and for each request asking for a protected resource, check that the CSRF cookie and the CSRF header of the request are matching:

csrfserver

Server workflow

Note that some JavaScript frameworks like AngularJS implements the client worflow out of the box; see Cross Site Request Forgery (XSRF) Protection

Java implementation of “double submit cookie” pattern

The proposed implementation is on the form of a (Java) Servlet filter and can be found here: GenericCSRFFilter GitHub.

In order to use the filter, you must define it into you web.xml file:

<filter>
   <filter-name>CSRFFilter</filter-name>
   <filter-class>com.github.adriancitu.csrf.GenericCSRFStatelessFilter</filter-class>
<filter>

<filter-mapping>
   <filter-name>CSRFFilter</filter-name>
   <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
</filter-mapping>

 

The filter can have 2 optional initialization parameters: csrfCookieName representing the name of the cookie that will store the CSRF token and csrfHeaderName representing the name of the HTTP header that will be also contains the CSRF token.

The default values for these parameters are “XSRF-TOKEN” for the csrfCookieName and “X-XSRF-TOKEN” for the csrhHeaderName, both of them being the default values that AngularJS is expecting to have in order to implement the CSRF protection.

By default the filter have the following features:

  • works with AngularJS.
  • the CSRF token will be a random UUID.
  • all the resources that are NOT accessed through a GET request method will be CSRF protected.
  • the CSRF cookie is replaced after each non GET request method.

How it’s working under the hood

The most of the functionality is in the GenericCSRFStatelessFilter#doFilter method; here is the sequence diagram that explains what’s happening in this method:

doFilter method sequence diagram

doFilter method sequence diagram

The doFilter method is executed on each HTTP request:

  1. The filter creates an instance of ExecutionContext class; this class is a simple POJO containing the initial HTTP request, the HTTP response, the CSRF cookies (if more than one cookie with the csrfCookieName is present) and implementation of the ResourceCheckerHook , TokenBuilderHook and ResponseBuilderHook .(see the next section for the meaning of this classes).
  2. The filter check the status of the HTTP resource, that status can be:MUST_NOT_BE_PROTECTED, MUST_BE_PROTECTED_BUT_NO_COOKIE_ATTACHED,MUST_BE_PROTECTED_AND_COOKIE_ATTACHED (see ResourceStatus enum) using an instance of ResourceCheckerHook.
  3. If the resource status is ResourceStatus#MUST_NOT_BE_PROTECTED
    ResourceStatus#MUST_BE_PROTECTED_BUT_NO_COOKIE_ATTACHED then
    the filter creates a CSRF cookie having as token the token generated by an instance of TokenBuilderHook.
  4. if the resource status ResourceStatus#MUST_BE_PROTECTED_AND_COOKIE_ATTACHED
    then compute the CSRFStatus of the resource and then use an instance of ResponseBuilderHook to return the response to the client.

How to extend the default behavior

It is possible to extend or overwrite the default behavior by implementing the hooks interfaces. All the hooks implementations must be thread safe.

  1. The ResourceCheckerHook is used to check the status of a requested resource. The default implementation is DefaultResourceCheckerHookImpl and it will return ResourceStatus#MUST_NOT_BE_PROTECTED for any HTTP GET method, for all the other request types, it will return {@link ResourceStatus#MUST_BE_PROTECTED_BUT_NO_COOKIE_ATTACHED if any CSRF cookie is present in the query or ResourceStatus#MUST_BE_PROTECTED_BUT_NO_COOKIE_ATTACHED otherwise.The interface signature is the following one:
    public interface ResourceCheckerHook extends Closeable {
        ResourceStatus checkResourceStatus(ExecutionContext executionContext);
    }  
  2. The TokenBuilderHook hook is used to generate the token that will be used to create the CSRF cookie. The default implementation  is DefaultTokenBuilderHookImpl and it uses a call to UUID.randomUUID to fetch a token. The interface signature is the following one:
    public interface TokenBuilderHook extends Closeable {
        String buildToken(ExecutionContext executionContext);
    }
  3. The ResponseBuilderHook is used to generate the response to the client depending of the CSRFStatus of the resource. The default implementation is DefaultResponseBuilderHookImpl and it throws a SecurityException if the CSRF status is CSRFStatus#COOKIE_NOT_PRESENT, CSRFStatus#HEADER_TOKEN_NOT_PRESENT or CSRFStatus#COOKIE_TOKEN_AND_HEADER_TOKEN_MISMATCH. If the CSRF status is CSRFStatus#COOKIE_TOKEN_AND_HEADER_TOKEN_MATCH then the old CSRF cookies are deleted and a new CSRF cookie is created. The interface signature is the following one:
    public interface ResponseBuilderHook extends Closeable {
        ServletResponse buildResponse(ExecutionContext executionContext,
                                      CSRFStatus status);
    }
    

The hooks are instantiated inside the GenericCSRFStatelessFilter#init method using the ServiceLoader Java 6 loading facility. So if you want to use your implementation of one of the hooks then you have to create a  META-INF/services directory that contains a text file whose name matches the fully-qualified interface class name of the hook that you want to replace.

Here is the sequence diagram representing the hooks initializations:

initmethod

How to use an external JavaScript file in a BIRT report

In a recent assignment I had to write some custom Java Script code to treat some table cells from an Eclipse BIRT report.

This ticket explains the setting of an external Java Script file in a BIRT report.

Define the resources folder for your BIRT project.

First step is to define the resources folder for your BIRT project. Go to the project properties -> Report Design ->Resource (as shown in the following screenshot). In our case the BIRT project is a (Java) Maven project so all the external resources are in the folder src/ressources.

BIRTProjectResourceSetting

Add the external Java Script file(s) to the BIRT report

In the property editor of the BIRT report, define the external resource files (in the following screenshot the “CustomFunctions.js” was added an external JavaScript file).

BIRTReportPropertyEditor

After adding the JS file, the rptdesign file the will look something like :

<report xmlns="http://www.eclipse.org/birt/2005/design" version="3.2.23" id="1">
 <property name="createdBy">Eclipse BIRT Designer Version 4.3.1.v201309091055 Build <4.3.1.v20130917-1035></property>
    <list-property name="includeScripts">
       <property>CustomFunctions.js</property>
     </list-property>
....

Use the custom JavaScript functions in the report

In the BIRT expression builder, use the custom JavaScript function (as in the following screenshot):

BIRTExpressionBuilder

Update the BIRT web viewer

When the war file will be created, the src/ressources content will be copied under the folder WEB-INF/classes so, the BIRT web viewer servlet should be instructed where to find the resources folder under using a context parameter:

 <!-- Resource location directory. Defaults to ${birt home} -->
 <context-param>
 <param-name>BIRT_RESOURCE_PATH</param-name>
 <param-value>WEB-INF/classes</param-value>
 </context-param>